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blitzmonkey
06-10-2012, 10:45 AM
I am not at my normal computer and do not have my bookmarks as well as I am failing to find anything definitive in search.

I am asking about charging something out of reach, also known as "fake charging". I know it's legal to cast some spells and charge something knowing that the model is out of reach.

If I want to charge a model that is at 12 o clock, can I charge in a 2/3 o clock position? Or do I have to charge in a 12 o clock line as well?

jandrese
06-10-2012, 10:48 AM
You have to take a charge line that, if you had unlimited movement and there were no models or terrain in the way, you would end up in melee range with the target.

blitzmonkey
06-10-2012, 11:02 AM
You have to take a charge line that, if you had unlimited movement and there were no models or terrain in the way, you would end up in melee range with the target.

So the way I see it is I have to charge in a direct straight line then towards the target, thus disallowing me from charging on a tangent line. I must charge going in a 12 o clock position. This is what I figured at least. How can I "prove" this to an opponent that may not buy this?

Edit: Essentially, my opponent can fake charge as long as he is directly torwards my model, he doesn't have to move center to center but he can't go off in any direction. He must move in a vector/ angle that is attempting to get me in melee. While charging on the first turn at a model, that corridor of approach is very tiny, not making it one single line, but making it a very small avenue to go. Right?

Crate123
06-10-2012, 11:22 AM
Show him the errata, if he doesnt believe you then, well then he cant read and you might have other problems.

You are mixing up some game terms here.
Directly facing: the center of your front arcs points directly towards the center of his base, you do not have to do this when you charge.
You can only move directly forwards in the direction you face, if your model is directly facing his then you will charge directly at his base which you do not have to do.
You can charge slightly to one side, but it has to be so that you would make it into melee if you had enough movement and there werent any models or terrain in the way.
If you do this in turn 1, then yes you wont have that much room to maneuvre since your 30" fake charge has to take you into melee (were it possible).

blitzmonkey
06-10-2012, 11:24 AM
I know the game terms crate but you are right. I'm at work and i am not using the "proper" terms. I appreciate the correction though!

CountDomar
06-10-2012, 12:18 PM
When charging an enemy it requires you to charge in a straight line (i.e. no maneuvering during the charge) but that does not mean that you have to charge direct at him (your center base to his center base). You can charge at a tangent so you will engage him from the side versus head on. However, you cannot state you are charging an enemy model and fail the charge on purpose by charging at such an angle that you do not get into melee range when you could have gotten within melee range by charging at a different angle.

blitzmonkey
06-10-2012, 12:31 PM
Follow up question: how does one handle when someone declares a charge to a model and fails due to misjudging the angel? Ex my Carnivean has a speed 6 + 3, so i have 9. What if I charge in an angle that I think will get me in range but doesn't? Is that just an illegal move if I had extra movement to get there?

solkan
06-10-2012, 12:58 PM
Follow up question: how does one handle when someone declares a charge to a model and fails due to misjudging the angel? Ex my Carnivean has a speed 6 + 3, so i have 9. What if I charge in an angle that I think will get me in range but doesn't?

Stop and ignore every other model on the board except the charging model and its charge target, and ignore every single piece of terrain as well.

If there's no possible point along the infinitely long line that you chose that will bring your model into melee range with your charge target, that is not a valid choice. Stop, go back, and make a valid choice.

If there is a possible point along that infinitely long line that you chose that will bring your model into melee range with your charge target, and you either don't have the movement to get there, or there's some obstacle preventing you from getting there, that's a completely valid charge direction. Since it's a legal charge direction, you're stuck with the results of moving in that direction.

To quote from Primal Mk II:

After declaring a charge, the charging model terns to face any direction that will bring it to within its melee range of its target, ignoring terrain, the distance to the charge target, and other models.

If you have a melee range of X", the only thing the rules care about is you can draw a line in the direction that you have chosen that passes within X" of the charge target.
It doesn't matter where that point is, whether your model has enough move to get there, or what that line passes through or over.

blitzmonkey
06-10-2012, 01:10 PM
Thanks everyone. Again, stuff I knew but needed "proof" to appease those who doubt.

lars4life
06-10-2012, 03:03 PM
Well sort of since you were telling me I had to charge directly towards the charge target and that is not the case. Glad it was cleared up. Ending in an infinite line that would bring you to melee limits the amount of "play" in the angle.

blitzmonkey
06-10-2012, 04:01 PM
I didn't exactly have the most elegant way of explaining it, no, as I was set back a little by having to explain it and didn't know how to properly. It's one of the rules I have always just taken to be the case. So no, I didn't say it the best. But I knew you couldn't do it. We now have proof for the next time Legion and Retribution throw down. :p